Pro-XRP lawyer Jeremy Hogan’s scam tweet bonanza finally falls silent

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The recent flood of scam tweets on pro-XRP lawyer Jeremy Hogan’s hacked account has finally dried up after nearly four days.

Since July 24, the XRP community has been diligently warning others and tagging Twitter’s support after they noticed Hogan’s account tweeting malicious links for a purported XRP (XRP) giveaway.

As of 1 am on July 28, all of the XRP-giveaway-related tweets have been deleted, suggesting Hogan has either regained access to his account or that Twitter support has finally intervened.

The last tweet sent out from Hogan’s account — now deleted — said that he was “feeling so generous” and offered to return double the amount of XRP sent to his address.

On-chain data shows the mentioned address managed to gain 784 XRP in three hours, amounting to approximately $561 at current prices. It was sent in by 12 users.

Transactions made to the most recently-posted fraudulent address. Source: XRPscan

The other tactics used by hackers throughout the ordeal included posting a series of links to a fraudulent “Ripplex.win” website — which at the time of publication, can no longer be reached.

According to Wayback Machine, the website has been suspended. It is unknown how much XRP was potentially misappropriated by the website.

Speaking in a July 27 Twitter space — from a different Twitter account — Hogan apologized for any inconvenience caused by the hack.

“I’ve done everything I can to regain control over it, but the guys that take control of these things are kind of evil geniuses and you wish they’d use their powers for good,” Hogan exclaimed. “I hope no one lost any money,” he added.

Related: Crypto investors cool on Bitcoin funds, turning to Ether and XRP

Fortunately, the “XRP Army” had continued to warn potential victims over the last few days, with multiple warnings posted by notable figures within the crypto community, including pro-XRP lawyer John Deaton and XRPcryptowolf who warned their combined 591,000 followers not to engage with Hogan’s account.

Hogan, a pro-XRP lawyer and popular figure in the crypto community, isn’t the first notable figure to fall victim to this kind of attack.

On June 4, Deaton’s account was attacked and tweets from the hackers began promoting a fraudulent token called LAW. After several days, Deaton managed to regain control of his account.

The dissemination of false and deceptive financial information within the crypto sector poses a significant risk to investors and markets, given that traders often rely on guidance from influential figures in the industry.

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